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Welcome to Studio 8H, our community portal! Here, you can find most of the links to our main pages, such as cast member profiles, important moments in SNL history and our archives of hosts and musical guests.


The WikiEdit


Interested in editing the wiki? The first place to start is by hovering over "Helping Out", at the top of the screen. The items in that menu will give you some general knowledge of wiki editing.

After that, you may want to check out the style guide, which gives general guidelines on how pages should be laid out. Also, have a quick look at the conduct guide, which details how users should treat one another.

Need an adult? The best people to contact are JeremyGU (talk page), who is the active administrator, and XD1 (talk page), a member of the Wikia staff who frequents here. Both can handle anything that requires an administrator.

Note that the pages and talk pages are meant to read like an encyclopedia. If you want to have a discussion about SNL, check out the forums. That's also the place to go for general discussions regarding the wiki.

Quick linksEdit

To-doEdit

  • Many episode articles need edited to be brought in line with the new color-coded system. Episodes from seasons 37-39 are also done with the sketches listed in one section, and the cast listed by sketch. It makes a lot more sense for the cast to be separate than the sketches (which is the current standardized style).
  • Category:Cast Members who Hosted isn't grammatically correct; could use renaming.
  • Special:UnusedFiles Many unused photos, most of which are fair use and shouldn't remain unused.
  • Change the main page slider to multiple photos for each option, via the "choose" tag.
  • I'm keeping an eye on a series of bugs with the welcome bot, user:Wikia. It hasn't been welcoming IPs (I've welcomed a couple manually), and it briefly logged itself out and started welcoming as user:127.0.0.1. Most recently, it welcomed a user and attributed the edit to my account, though I didn't make that edit (link). I've contacted Wikia about that last one, since mismatches between edits and user names is a pretty major problem.

History of the wikiEdit



Saturday Night LiveEdit


See also: What's SNL?

Creators/Executive Producers Edit

  • Lorne Michaels Co-Creator, Executive Producer 1975-1980, 1985-Present (seasons 1-5, 11-present)
  • Dick Ebersol Co-Creator, Executive Producer 1981-1985 (season 6 ep. 13-season 10)
  • Jean Doumanian Executive Producer 1980-1981 (season 6 eps. 1-12)

Current Cast Edit

Repertory Players Edit

Featured Players Edit

Notable Tenures Edit

SNL has been the home to many great talents, and some have been on the show for an amazing period of time. Although there have been many great comedians on the show over 30 years, few have been on the show for 8 seasons or longer. Here is a (short) list of those who did, and those who broke the record:

Also, SNL has been the home of some comedians for a very, very short time. Here are those who have the record shortest tenure:

In Memoriam Edit

A tribute to those involved with SNL who passed away. Posted next to each person's name is the year of their death.

Announcers Edit

Fill-in announcersEdit

Five-Timers Club Edit

The Five-Timers Club includes all people who have hosted the show at least five times.

Note: Paul Simon has been included in several sketches centered on the Five-Timers Club. He has only hosted four times, but has also appeared eight times as musical guest and five as a special guest.

Others with many appearances Edit

See also: Archives of Hosts and Musical Guests

History Edit

MythsEdit

Saturday Night Live has seen many notable myths and confusions spread throughout its history.

Louise Lasser as hostEdit

It is often repeated that Louise Lasser was banned after a horrible performance, which included racing away from the monologue to lock herself in her dressing room. This rumor is mostly true, except for one fact: the dressing room scene was staged. Upon closer inspection, the cast's interaction with Lasser through the closed door is rehearsed, and it would have been impossible to hear Lasser through the door if the sound department hadn't made arrangements beforehand.

However, while the dressing room sketch was pre-written, it was based upon her behavior during the week. She had been difficult to work with and high on drugs; at one point, she crawled into Lorne Michaels' office on her hands and knees. While it is the dressing room sketch that many remember, the proof of her behavior comes from what isn't in the show- Louise Lasser. As a means of keeping the show going, most of her sketches were cut; we only see her live in one sketch (which features her alone, talking to a dog), the opening monologue, a second (rambling) monologue, and two pre-taped pieces.

Chevy Chase's injuryEdit

It was said on the show, in the second episode of the second season, that Chevy Chase was injured in the previous episode. The injury was not real; it was scripted. (This rumor is often stretched to say this was the only time an ambulance was needed to take someone away during a show.)

The immediate proof of this comes from the episode in which Chase was supposedly injured, September 18, 1976. The final sketch of the show is a large dance number, with host Lily Tomlin singing, called the "Antler Dance". Chase can clearly be seen dancing along with the rest of the cast, proving that he not only hadn't been rushed away, but was not suffering from any serious groin injury.

In reality, Chase was already planning his exit when the second season was starting. (He had never signed a contract as an actor, only as head writer, and was not willing to sign an actor contract.) With Chase such an integral part of the show, singularly handling both the opening line and Weekend Update, some sort of transition was needed. Missing two episodes and returning for a few proved the best way to try out other cast members in the opening sketch and Update desk, and a fake story about an injury was the perfect backstory to explain being away while still being credited.

Charles Grodin as hostEdit

It is often repeated that, while hosting in season 3, Charles Grodin stopped the show several times to question the material, as well as showing up late. All of it was scripted.

His late appearance to the opening is the easiest to explain. Had he really been late, he wouldn't have known where the live cameras were; the odds would be almost astronomical for him to walk in the live shot. In addition, a missing host would not trigger the cameras to be aimed at cast members having a real conversation about the missing host; something would be put forward to kill time (likely an extra sketch that had been cut after dress rehearsal).

Later, Grodin does appear to stop two sketches- a Belushi samurai sketch (Samurai Dry Cleaners) and a sketch featuring the bees. The previous lampooning of the bees should have been a tipoff that the sketch wasn't real; but upon watching the scene, Grodin is noticeably reading his supposedly ad-libbed lines from a cue card. During the Samurai Dr Cleaners sketch, he both asks Gilda Radner questions about the scene, and appears to start reading Belushi's cue cards. However, Radner and Belushi's responses are more calm than actors reacting to an actual problem- as the Milton Berle episode shows, actual ad-libs cause the cast members to stumble, usually causing the show to briefly grind to a halt. The fact that Radner and Belushi react with little difficulty shows Grodin's actions were rehearsed.

In reality, the fact that Grodin would write such breakings of the fourth wall should come as no surprise. He frequently pretends to have issues spring up on show appearances- he pretended to argue with Johnny Carson more than once, pretended to take a cell phone call on-air while talking to David Letterman, and complained to Jon Stewart about his treatment backstage when appearing on The Daily Show.[1] In fact, Grodin has since stated that he specifically wrote the interruptions for his SNL appearance because improvising would be impossible, and learning the sketches would be more difficult due to their ever-changing nature.[2]

Memorable Moments Edit

Banned List Edit

This is a list of performers/comedians who have been banned, or are rumored to have been banned, from ever againappearing on SNL. These people range from one-time hosts (Lasser, Berle, etc.) to regular guests (Kaufman) to former cast members who returned to host multiple times (Chase). The date posted beside their name denotes the day they were banned, and if they have a certain amount of years beside their name, either their ban was lifted (Elvis Costello) or they have since died. Names in bold note people and bands whose bans are still in effect.

It's important to note that SNL has rarely made announcements when people were banned. Much of SNL's history of bans is rumor and speculation; many scripted performances have been confused for ad-libbing by the audience. Some of those listed below are rumored to have been banned, but it is possible or even likely that no such ban ever existed. Descriptions are given below; also see the "Myths" section above.

  • Louise Lasser, (July 24, 1976) who hosted at the end of the first season on July 24, 1976, was the first host banned by the producers. Lasser was said to be going through personal problems at the time and was reportedly nearly incoherent throughout the broadcast. It should be noted that her locking herself in her dressing room was scripted, not an unscripted occurrence as has been rumored, but the idea for the sketch came from Lasser's actual behavior during the previous week. This episode was such a disappointment to producer Lorne Michaels that it was also not repeated on NBC, although it has appeared in syndication since 1981.
  • Charles Grodin, (October 29, 1977) has supposedly never been asked back to host after his hosting in October of 1977. This famously rumored ban is one that is likely only a rumor; while many viewers believed Grodin was stopping the show to complain about the sketches, his lines were quite obviously scripted.
  • On December 17, 1977, Elvis Costello (December 17, 1977) (video) - 12 Years (returned 1989) performed as a last-minute replacement for the Sex Pistols, who were unable to obtain passports. NBC and the show's producer Lorne Michaels didn't want the band to perform "Radio, Radio", since the song protests the state of the media. The band defied them by beginning to play their song "Less Than Zero", stopping, with Costello telling the audience that there was no reason to do that song, and telling the band to play "Radio, Radio" instead. It infuriated Michaels because it put the show off schedule, and the band were barred from performing again.
    • Elvis Costello holds the distinction of being the only person to return to SNL after being banned.

AwardsEdit

2014 American Comedy AwardsEdit

  • Saturday Night Live in the category "Comedy Series"
  • Vanessa Bayer and Kate McKinnon in the category "Comedy Supporting Actress — TV" for their work on SNL
  • Bill Hader in the category "Comedy Supporting Actor — TV" for his work on SNL
  • SNL Alums Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Sarah Silverman, Will Ferrell, Will Forte, Kristen Wiig, Fred Armisen, Amy Poehler, and Andy Samberg for projects in which they've participated since leaving SNL

2014 Emmy Award nominationsEdit

  • Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Comedy Series: Kate McKinnon
  • Outstanding Guest Actress In A Comedy Series: Tina Fey and Melissa McCarthy
  • Outstanding Guest Actor In A Comedy Series: Jimmy Fallon and Louis C.K.
  • Outstanding Directing For A Variety Series
  • Outstanding Variety Series
  • Outstanding Hairstyling For A Multi-Camera Series Or Special
  • Outstanding Lighting Design
  • Outstanding Makeup For A Multi-Camera Series Or Special (Non-Prosthetic)
  • Outstanding Original Music And Lyrics
  • Outstanding Technical Direction, Camerawork, Video Control For A Series
  • Outstanding Art Direction For Variety, Nonfiction, Reality or Reality-Competition Programming
  • Outstanding Musical Direction[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. The Awkward, Hostile, and Absolutely Hilarious Late Night Appearances of Charles Grodin
  2. Interview with The AV Club: "I just got the idea that that would be funny, that I didn’t know it was live, that I had just come in from New York, and then I say, “This is live?” They asked me to do it again, but I chose not to, because I can do two things: I can learn a script, or I can improvise. But you can’t improvise there, because it’s all done to time, and you can’t learn a script, because they’re changing it, changing it, changing it, so you’re pretty much forced to read teleprompters, and I just didn’t want to do it again."
  3. SNL Tumblr: Congrats to our Emmy Nominees!

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